Charles Gaudet

Charles Gaudet

How To Win The Battle For Market Dominance

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One of my multi-million dollar Platinum Coaching clients said to me:

Charlie, I know this sounds crazy, but we’ve grown so fast, we’ve lost knowing what business we’re in. Can you help us?”

This is one of the distinguishing factors secretly driving those 8, 9… Even 10-figure companies that goes unseen by many 6 and 7-figure businesses.

Google, Apple, Netflix, Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook, and many others have figured it out.

It doesn’t require you to spend any money to put it into action either…

…And is generally far more powerful than any traditional marketing strategy on the planet…

…And sets you up for winning a marathon (not a sprint).

We call it The Commander’s Intent.

Briefly explained, The Commander’s Intent is your “ultimate win” – your “desired destination.”

It’s a term taken from the military, defined as:

“Commander’s Intent manages to align the behavior of soldiers at all levels without requiring play-by-play instructions from their leaders.”

Chip and Dan Heath have written about this in their best-selling book “Made to Stick” – and we’re taking it further.

You see, the whole reason I’m writing this article is because it satisfies the Commander’s Intent for Predictable Profits.

Let me explain…

Tactically, we position Predictable Profits as the company empowering growth-minded entrepreneurs with strategies, techniques, and ideas for rapidly creating an ever-increasing and predictable source of profits.

But Strategically, we’re in a slightly different business…

Strategically, we are in the business of providing small businesses with a competitive edge.

The strategic element represents our Commander’s Intent.

If I didn’t believe this article would satisfy one of the objectives of our Commander’s Intent, you would never have seen it.

Back to the military for a second…

Tactically, the Officer gives orders to the troops by detailing what targets must be destroyed, and how to do it with minimal casualties. Strategically, it may be to bring peace to the region. See the difference?

Let me show you an example of how powerful this strategy is for dominating your market…

Perhaps the best example I can give you is Amazon.

Their Commander’s Intent is:

We seek to be Earth’s most customer-centric company for four
primary customer sets: consumers, sellers, enterprises, and content creators.

Reaffirmed in their 2014 letter to their shareholders, Jeff Bezos said Amazon has a customer obsession.

Everything is designed around delivering the fastest, most convenient, easiest, and most enjoyable experience possible. They’re always asking themselves The Growth Factor question: what else can we do to provide our customers a greater advantage, benefit, value, and experience to get them closer to the ultimate result they are after?

And it’s because of this relentless obsession with their Commander’s Intent that they announced a genius joint venture with JetBlue…

…Giving customers a greater advantage, more convenience, and a better experience.

My brother once worked for Amazon, and shared with me that the company would spend MILLIONS of dollars developing a technology for increasing the speed of their websites and mobile applications by as little as 1/10 of a second! Why? Because the faster the service, the happier the customers.

You might remember, from a past newsletter or blog post, where I told you that Amazon automatically credited my wife (without her making the request) with the purchase of a movie she made, just because they detected a problem with the streaming of the video on her device. This is an example of them working to satisfy their Commander’s Intent.

Now, many folks look at Google as a search engine. Tactically, that’s what they are best known for…

But strategically, Google is different.

Their Commander’s Intent is to organize the world’s information…

That’s why they bought Nest, a leader in home automation.

…And also why they’ve also acquired companies in customer relationship management, online advertising, blogging, image organizers, traffic analysis, map analysis, web analysis, social networking, mobile browsing, broadband internet access, software, video sharing, VOIP, gaming, mobile, etc.

You see, how you’re positioned tactically drives your marketing message… It’s the ruby red exterior of your Ferrari… But the muscle, power, and competitive edge of your business come from what’s driving your company… That’s your Commander’s Intent.

Take a moment and ask yourself:

  • Tactically, what business am I in?
  • Strategically, what business am I in?

If Facebook just thought of themselves as a “social network,” they would have fallen by the side of companies like MySpace – who became victim of having tunnel vision and a weak Commander’s Intent. Facebook’s intent, on the other hand, is to give people the power to share, and to make the world more open and connected. That’s why Facebook offers mobile versions, video chatting, Messenger, and a slew of other technologies.

If I thought of myself as just a “marketing consultant,” I’d be limited to spreading different ideas and strategies for growing a business…

Instead, because I’m the guy who’s giving small business owners a competitive edge, it opens the doors to many opportunities beyond marketing consulting…

Opportunities like finding, developing, managing, and training of a sales team for a client… Just last month alone, this brand new venture grossed over $40,000 for our client, and with new hires and a plan in place, we’re expecting this to grow into an 8-figure operation. 

As Tony Robbins says, “Success leaves clues.”

There’s a reason why 8, 9, and 10-figure companies take the time to consider the strategic direction of their business. Google’s not just a search engine – they are “simplifying the world’s information.” You’re not just in the product/service you sell… You are something bigger. 

So… what are you?

More to explore

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